Article · Blog · Bug · Cars · Design · Hummer · Icons · Mini Cooper · Reverse Engineering Post · Truck · Uncategorized · Visual Design
Designer: Megan Merkley (personally done)

 

Hello again! This is just a short and sweet post to show you another of my design projects. This time my goal was to create 4 different icons, I wanted them to be recognized as a group but also as individual icon as well.

 

Reasons Behind The Design

I chose to do cars because my father and brother are mechanics, so I’ve grown up around cars and grown to love them along the way.

The reasons I chose the cars I did was because I planned my audience to be from the USA. So I did cars that are common in the USA and also did the colors that those cars are often seen in and or portrayed as.

 

 

Sizing

I created these in Adobe Illustrator be cause they need to be created with vector graphics. This being because raster uses pixels, so when you blow it up it can get really pixelated. Where as with vector images they are “resolution independent”, because vector uses points/mathematical lines and curves.

When making icons you want them to be able to be any size you need them to be (examples below). This is made possible with vector graphics (a.k.a. Adobe Illustrator).

 

Designer: Megan Merkley (personally done)

 

 

Designer: Megan Merkley (personally done)

 

 

Designer: Megan Merkley (personally done)

 

 

Designer: Megan Merkley (personally done)

 

 

All in all, I had a blast making these! I’m so glad we have this kind of technology so I could do this. Hope you enjoy these to and see how much fun you can have making/designing icons, or how great cars are!

Article · Blog · Depth of Field · Design · Leading Lines · Magazine · Magazine Spread · Photography · Reverse Engineering Post · Rule of Thirds · Typography · Uncategorized · Visual Design

Making a Fun and Unique Magazine Spread/Article

Unofficial Ad
Designer: Megan Merkley (personally done)
Unofficial Ad
Designer: Megan Merkley (personally done)

 

Hey there! This post is to show you a Magazine spread I designed, and how I used the Principals of Design to influence the way I put it together.

 

Audience and Message

Before you start it is important to know what message you are trying to get across. Once you know that, who are you trying to get that message to?

I wanted my message to give strength and help others stay strong in their faith. And my target audience is youth, and young adults, ages 14 to 25. Guys and girls, anywhere in the world.

I kept the audience pretty general because I want it to reach and touch as many as it can, so I can help share the message and testimony in it!!

 

Colors and Feelings

I used the “soft” but bright green to get attention and to help the reader feel the importance and warning the article conveys, without it being to strong or overwhelming. I then used the blue, gray to calm it down even more and to bring it the feeling of peace and calm. I wanted both of these colors because I wanted my audience to know that this is important and that they may be stressed but by following these guide lines they will be able to find rest and things will be OK!

 

Photography

The pictures I took were to show that we are all on the same path, we’re all struggling through life. I had my friends dress as they normally do to show that this article is for every everyday person, or in other words it applies to all of us! I also slanted the colors on the first page as well as first picture to lead the eye towards the picture of the Book of Mormon and temple to show that that is the goal. Even with in the picture of the temple I have the Book of Mormon in the focus and the temple in the back ground not only to use the field of depth concept to make the picture look good, but also to show that as long as we focus on the Book of Mormon and really study it, we will reach our goal (the Temple).

 

Acknowledgements

Please read the whole article at https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2009/10/safety-for-the-soul?lang=eng.

 

Photo by James Dalrymple.
Photographer: Megan Merkley (personally taken)
Photographer: Megan Merkley (personally taken)